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Pioneer Women`s Memorial Garden

 

King William Road

Bus stop Z2 travelling from North into Adelaide CBD or stop A2 travelling into the Adelaide CBD from the South.

A short walk from the Adelaide Railway Station.

Tram from Glenelg or Adelaide Entertainment Centre, stop on North Terrace.

Parking: Festival Drive, enter off King William Road

The car park is equipped with a lift and ramps which are accessible from all car park spaces. To pre-book your disability space please call BASS on 131 246. Bookings must be made no later than 12 noon the day before the park is required or by Friday 12 noon for a weekend car park.





Events

TUE 5 MAR

West Stage 9.30am - The Biographer: Brenda Niall 10.45am - The Singer’s Gun: Emily St John Mandel 12pm - The Food Thing: Max Allen, Fuchsia Dunlop, Steven Poole 1.15pm - The Politics of the Stage: Bryony Lavery & Omphile Molusi 2.30pm - The Chameleon: Charlotte Wood 3.45pm -

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SUN 3 MAR

West Stage 9.30am - From Sea to Sea: Karen Solie & Zsuzsi Gartner 10.45am - You Aren’t What You Eat: Steven Poole 12pm - M L Stedman 1.15pm - Dogs at the Perimeter: Madeleine Thien 2.30pm - Girl Power: Justine Larbalestier, Isobelle Carmody, Vikki Wakefield 3.45pm - Redemptio

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MON 4 MAR

West Stage 9.30am - 1835: James Boyce 10.45am - All Stories are Love Stories: Karen Lord, Emily St John Mandel, Charlotte Wood 12pm - The Writing on the Wall: Parker Bilal and Adrian McKinty 1.15pm - It Takes a Village: Shanaka Fernando & Andrea Hirata 2.30pm - The Power of Negati

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WED 6 MAR

West Stage 9.30am - All the Anxious Girls: Zsuzsi Gartner 10.45am - Say You’re Sorry: Michael Robotham 12pm - Not Quite Crime: Zane Lovitt & Emily St John Mandel 1.15pm - The Subjects: Storytelling in Extreme Environments 2.30pm - Belomor: Nicolas Rothwell 3.45pm - Blood: Ton

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THU 7 MAR

West Stage 9.30am - Storm and Honey: Judith Beveridge 10.45am - Somerton Mystery: Kerry Greenwood 12pm - Griffith Review: Tasmania 1.15pm - The Review Page: Zsuzsi Gartner, Emily St John Mandel & Geordie Williamson 2.30pm - Cricket: Gideon Haigh 3.45pm - Indigenous Literacy Fou

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SAT 2 MAR

West Stage 10.45am - The Conversation: David Brooks 12pm - Words Vs. Images: Oliver Burkeman, Pat Grant, Olivier Pollet 1.15pm - Short Haul Engine: Karen Solie 2.30pm - The Next Generation: LK Holt, Josephine Rowe, Fiona Wright 3.45pm - Writing South Australia: Dylan Coleman & Ste

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The Conversation: David Brooks

West Stage, 10.45am David Brooks is the author of four novels, most recenty The Conversation, collections of poetry, short fiction and essays. His second novel, The Fern Tattoo, was shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Award, and The Balcony, his latest collection of poetry, for the NSW Premier's K

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Say You're Sorry: Michael Robotham

West Stage, 10.45am Former journalist and successful ghost writer Michael Robotham is now an international crime writer who has to date published eight novels. His novels include The Suspect, Ned Kelly Award winner Lost, Shatter, Bleed for Me and The Wreckage. In his new novel, Say You’re Sorry

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Story Tent at Adelaide Writers' Week

The Story Tent is back! Drop in for a visit or stay for a while and you’ll hear some amazing storytelling. Under our tent you can listen to a story, learn a song, or watch someone draw a comic. Along the way you’ll meet a very grumpy bear, an angel, an elf troll and a whole lot more. Story Te

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Not Quite Crime: Zane Lovitt & Emily St John Mandel

West Stage, 12pm Zane Lovitt’s debut novel, The Midnight Promise, is told in 10 stories. All of the stories feature John Dorn, damaged private eye, trying to solve the mysteries of human nature. At the heart of each of Emily St John Mandel’s novels is a crime, and yet none are crime stories.

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Belomor: Nicolas Rothwell

West Stage, 2.30pm Essayist, fiction writer, foreign correspondent, travel writer, explorer, Darwin resident and curious soul. Nicolas Rothwell is one our most inventive writers. He is the award-winning author of Heaven and Earth, Wings of the Kite-Hawk, Another Country, The Red Highway and Journ

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The Subjects: Storytelling in Extreme Environments

West Stage, 1.15pm Writers and artists are experts at imagining and creating the lives and worlds of others – but what happens when the tables are turned and they become their own Subjects? Professor Drew Dawson, Director of the CQU Appleton Institute, joins writer, Jennifer Mills and artists,

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Blood: Tony Birch

West Stage, 3.45pm Tony Birch was born in inner-city Melbourne, into a large family of Aboriginal, West Indian and Irish descent. His upbringing was challenging and this is reflected in much of his fiction, not only his semi-autobiographical debut Shadowboxing, but also his more recent Blood. Bir

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The Hazel Rowley Memorial Lecture: Alex Miller

West Stage, 5pm The Hazel Rowley Memorial Lecture commemorates the life and work of esteemed biographer Hazel Rowley. In this lecture, her long-time friend Alex Miller reflects on their relationship, their correspondence, and the writing life. Like Rowley, Miller is one of Australia’s most cele

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The Engagement: Chloe Hooper

East Stage, 9.30am With her new novel The Engagement Chloe Hooper returns to writing fiction. In her first novel, The Child’s Book of True Crime, Hooper revealed a fascination with the Gothic that continues, in an even more sinister way, with this new novel. The Engagement tells the story of yo

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On Black Sisters' Street: Chika Unigwe

East Stage, 10.45am Chika Unigwe is a Nigerian writer; she is the author of fiction, poetry, and articles. She has two novels available in English; On Black Sister’s Street tells the story of four African women working in Antwerp’s red-light district and it has recently won the prestigious Ni

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Bird Watching: Janine Burke & Peter Doherty

East Stage, 12pm Janine Burke’s Nest: the Art of Birds is a part natural history, part exploration of arts and aesthetics and part memoir. Peter Doherty’s Sentinel Chickens: What Birds Tell Us about Our Heath and World is a scientific and personal survey of the birds in our ecosystem. Join th

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Earthmaster: Clive Hamilton

East Stage, 1.15pm Spraying sulphur compounds into the upper atmosphere to reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the planet? Transforming the chemistry of the world’s oceans so they soak up more carbon? These ideas sound like science fiction but technologies to ‘geoengineer’ the planet are

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Nine Days: Toni Jordan

East Stage, 2.30pm Toni Jordon’s debut novel, Addition, is a contemporary and quirky love story, and was short-listed for the Barbara Jefferis Award and long-listed for the Miles Franklin. Her second, Fall Girl, is a tale of passion and deceit. Her most recent novel, Nine Days, is a very differ

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Flinders: Rob Mundle

East Stage, 3.45pm Rob Mundle is a writer, journalist, broadcaster and competitive sailor. Mundle is the author of international bestseller Fatal Storm and Bligh: Master Mariner. Most recently he has published Flinders: The Man Who Mapped Australia – a gripping account of the heroism, shipwreck

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Closing Address: Nicolas Rothwell

East Stage, 5pm In this final session of Writers’ Week, essayist and fiction writer Nicolas Rothwell will deliver an address on the ways that ideas about Australia in literature, art and thought have helped shape Modern Europe. Join this important thinker as he explores an Australia imaged in m

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Storm and Honey: Judith Beveridge

West Stage, 9.30am Judith Beveridge is one of our most esteemed poets. Her award-winning collections include: The Domesticity of Giraffes, Accidental Grace, How to Love Bats: and other poems, Wolf Notes and most recently Storm and Honey. Storm and Honey chronicles the working life of a trawler’

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Somerton Mystery: Kerry Greenwood

West Stage, 10.45am Kerry Greenwood is a bestselling author and solicitor. She has written many plays and books, most notably a series of historical detective novels centred on the character of Phryne Fisher. Greenwood has to date written 19 Fisher novels, the most recent being Unnatural Habits.

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Griffith Review: Tasmania

West Stage, 12pm The most recent issue of the Griffith Review, Tasmania – The Tipping Point?, challenges how Tasmania is seen by outsiders – and illuminates how Tasmanians see themselves, down home and in the wider world. This session brings together contributing writers and Tasmanians Daniel

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The Review Page: Zsuzsi Gartner, Emily St John Mandel & Geordie Williamson

West Stage, 1.15pm An all too familiar lament is where have all the books pages gone? This session brings together editor and writer, and former journalist, Zsuzsi Garnter, Emily St John Mandel, staff writer for the online literary magazine The Millions, and Geordie Williamson, chief literary cri

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Cricket: Gideon Haigh

West Stage, 2.30pm Gideon Haigh is a much admired sports and business writer. This prolific author has published a raft of books, including, most recently, The Office: A Hardworking History and On Warne, a biography of Shane Warne. In On Warne, Haigh gives an assessment of Warne as bowler, cricke

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Indigenous Literacy Foundation

West Stage, 3.45pm ‘Can you imagine a world without books and reading?’ Since 2004 the Indigenous Literacy Foundation has been working with Aboriginal communities, especially their children, to improve literacy rates.  This session brings together writers who are trying to encourage change t

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The Writing on the Wall: Parker Bilal and Adrian McKinty

West Stage, 12pm Politics and crime have long made fascinating bedfellows, no more so than in the books of Parker Bilal and Adrian McKinty. In The Golden Scales and Dogstar Rising Bilal explores contemporary Egypt - its corruption, poverty and ethnic unease. In The Sean Duffy Trilogy McKinty take

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Adelaide Writers' Week

Schedule by day List of authors Special events   The Adelaide Writers' Week 2014 program once again brings together some of the finest writers and thinkers. This year the program celebrates emerging writers and pays tribute to some of contemporary literature's most renowned voices. We hav

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Kids' Days - Adelaide Writers' Week

Come along and join us for two fun-filled days of stories, puppets, paintings and the Nylon Zoo. Nest Studio is back and bigger than ever, come along and spend some time with The Press Club (ages eight to 12), Little Artists (zero to eight) and new for this year Illustrating a Book. Children of all

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Saturday 1 March

West Stage: 9.30am - Dark Hearts: Patrick Holland & Chris Womersley 10.45am - True Romance: Victoria Purman and Fiona McIntosh 12pm - Kingdom of Strangers: Zoe Ferraris 1.15pm - Read To Me: Mem Fox & Andy Griffiths 2.30pm - Poop - Past, Present and Future: David Waltner-Toews

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Sunday 2 March

West Stage: 9.30am - Randolph Stow: Gabrielle Carey 10.45am - The Golden Bird: Robert Adamson 12pm - Crime and Cowboys: Lenny Bartulin & Zoe Ferraris 1.15pm - Imagining Worlds: Catherine Jinks & Elizabeth Knox 2.30pm - The Storyteller: Rabih Alameddine 3.45pm - First Nation

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Monday 3 March

West Stage: 9.30am – Cold Light: Frank Moorhouse 10.45am – Apple Tree Yard: Louise Doughty 12pm – The Past Isn't Past: Richard Flanagan & Tom Keneally 1.15pm – In Translation: Bernardo Atxaga & Jordi Punti 2.30pm – Betrayal: Adriaan van Dis 3.45pm – Piano Lesson

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Tuesday 4 March

West Stage: 9.30am - A World of Other People: Steven Carroll 10.45am - The Following: Roger McDonald 12pm - Radiance: Louis Nowra 1.15pm - Obabakoak: Bernardo Atxaga 2.30pm - For God and Country: Amy Espeseth & Kathryn Heyman 3.45pm - How Story Finds a Form: Lisa Jacobson, Greg

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Wednesday 5 March

West Stage: 9.30am - Love and Poetry: Mark Tredinnick 10.45am - WWI: Stephen Daisley, Helen Dunmore & Geoff Page 12pm - On Travel: Michelle de Kretser & Jaspreet Singh 1.15pm - Mortal Fire: Elizabeth Knox 2.30pm - Jade Ladder: Yang Lian 3.45pm - My Beautiful Enemy: Cory Tay

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Thursday 6 March

West Stage: 9.30am - The Lie: Helen Dunmore 10.45am - Love in War Time: Steven Carroll & Cory Taylor 12pm - His Own Steam: Gregory O'Brien 1.15pm - The Colony: Kristyn Harman & Henry Reynolds 2.30pm - Improving the News: Geoff Page 3.45pm - Subcultures: Jeet Thayil & Ch

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Ballistics

D W Wilson is an extraordinary young novelist and short story writer. He is the author of a collection of stories, First You Break a Knuckle and the novel Ballistics.  In both Wilson explores relationships between men, especially those between fathers and sons. His stories are set within the confi

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Dark Hearts

In Patrick Holland’s literary thriller The Darkest Little Room a foreign journalist living in Saigon finds himself searching the city’s brothels for a beautiful woman covered in wounds. Chris Womersley’s novels are populated by petty criminals (The Low Road), returned soldiers (Bereft) and art

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The Pure Gold Baby

Margaret Drabble is one of contemporary literature’s most celebrated voices. Her now iconic novels include A Summer Birdcage, The Needle’s Eye, The Ice Age and most recently The Pure Gold Baby. In this new novel Drabble turns her eye to 1960s London and the story of Jess, a single mother, and he

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True Romance

This session is for fans of love and romance. Join Victoria Purman, Fiona McIntosh and Phillipa Fioretti in conversation.  

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Kingdom of Strangers

In her series of mysteries featuring the charismatic Saudi heroine and forensic scientist Katya Hijazi, American novelist Zoe Ferraris explores the secrets and lies lurking in Saudi society. Her novels to date include The Night of the Mi’raj, City of Veils and The Kingdom of Strangers. Get a glimp

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Read To Me

Two of Australia’s greatest advocates for children and reading are two of its most celebrated children’s writers. This session brings together the beloved author of Possum Magic, Mem Fox, and the maniacally fun Andy Griffiths for a conversation about writing for children, becoming advocates for

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Earth Hour

David Malouf is the internationally acclaimed author of novels including The Great World, Remembering Babylon and his autobiographical classic, 13 Edmondstone Street. He is also a much-celebrated poet. This March Malouf celebrates his 80th birthday and the publication of a new collection of poetry,

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The Hill of Wool

Jenny Bornholdt is a much celebrated poet, editor and anthologist. Her many award-winning collections of poems include Miss New Zealand, These Days, Summer, The Rocky Shore and most recently The Hill of Wool. Bornholdt’s idiosyncratic take on the world, her wry sense of humour and her love of word

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The Critical Distance

What is the power of a book review? Is it just about selling books or is it about building a career? Join book reviewers Kerryn Goldsworthy and Jennifer Mills along with Overland editor Jeff Sparrow – all of whom happen to be writers – as they discuss the perils of book reviewing and being revie

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Poop - Past, Present and Future

David Waltner-Toews is a veterinarian, epidemiologist, scientist, and popular author who specialises in diseases animals share with people, international development, and ecosystem approaches to health. In this session this renowned scientist will talk about his important new book The Origin of Fece

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2014 Adelaide Festival Awards for Literature

This session will announce the winners of all 2014 Adelaide Festival Awards for Literature including the Fiction, Children’s Literature, Non-Fiction, Young Adult Fiction, John Bray Poetry and the Premier’s Award. Also the state-based winners of the Jill Blewett Playwright’s Award and the Wakef

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Local Heroes

David Day is an award-winning historian whose books include Antarctica: A Biography and most recently Flaws in the Ice: In Search of Douglas Mawson. After completing his own six week Antarctic journey, Day set out to answer some of the difficult questions that surround Mawson – including his failu

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The Luminaries

When Eleanor Catton won the Man Booker Prize in 2013 she became the youngest writer to do so – and she did it with an 800-page novel set in the gold fields of New Zealand. The Luminaries is an extraordinary novel, one so cleverly plotted it is as much a page-turning thriller as it is a book about

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True Grit

In this session you will journey into the dark heart of the family with novelists David Vann and D W Wilson. In Vann’s Goat Mountain a boy goes hunting with his father and grandfather and catastrophe unfolds. In D W Wilson’s Ballistics, a young man is sent out to find a father he has never known

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The Signature of All Things

Despite the enormous fame of Eat, Pray, Love, Elizabeth Gilbert is first and foremost a novelist. With The Signature of All Things Gilbert has written an ambitious novel about a lady botanist inspired by the voyages of Captain Cook. Set in the early years of the nineteenth century, this epic novel t

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Randolph Stow

When her mother was dying Gabrielle Carey wrote to her mother’s old friend Randolph Stow. Stow’s response and the brief correspondence that followed set Carey off on a literary pilgrimage; Moving Among Strangers is the result. Carey’s wonderful book is an account of her family secrets and, imp

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The Balkans

Sean McMeekin is an American historian living in Istanbul with a particular interest in the modern history of the Balkans. McMeekin’s books include The Berlin-Baghdad Express: The Ottoman Empire and Germany’s Bid for World Power, The Russian Origins of The First World War, and most recently, Jul

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The Golden Bird

Robert Adamson is a poet, publisher and memoirist. His first collection of poems Canticles on the Skin was published in 1970. Today his collections include The Goldfinches of Baghdad, The Golden Bird and most recently The Kingfisher’s Soul. Adamson is also the author of the autobiography Inside Ou

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Crime and Cowboys

Among the many possibilities of genre fiction is the ability to safely take on tricky topics. In his novel Infamy, Bartulin tells the history of Tasmania’s penal past as a literary western. In her series of Saudi thrillers, Ferraris is able to explore the cloistered world of women in the Middle Ea

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Imagining Worlds

If you have ever wondered how a writer creates a world that can only have been imagined, join these two award-winning novelists as they discuss the craft of creation. Both are incredibly prolific writers and among their many award-winning books are The City of Orphans series by Jinks and Dreamhunter

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Making Modern China

In her new biography of Empress Dowager Cixi, celebrated writer Jung Chang argues that Cixi “brought medieval China into the modern age.” The story she tells is of a compelling character, a smart woman who began her imperial life as a concubine, only to rule China for almost 50 years. Join her i

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The Novelists

Margaret Drabble and Helen Dunmore are two of England’s most acclaimed novelists who have written about the intricacies and intimacies of the family, and friendships in peace and wartime. Both writers are also well known for writing in other genres, Drabble as a biographer and Dunmore as a poet an

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On Writing: Love and War

Richard Flanagan is among our most celebrated novelists, and the reception of his new novel The Narrow Road to the Deep North has been extraordinary. The novel tells the story of a young doctor and POW working on the notorious Thai-Burma railway. This savagely beautiful novel is about marriage, mate

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The Storyteller

With his best-selling novel The Hakawati, Rabih Alameddine established himself as a formidable storyteller. With his new novel An Unnecessary Woman, it is clear that he is also an important writer. Set in Alameddine’s home city Beirut, the novel tells the story of a woman living alone. It is a hau

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First Nations Australian Writers Network

First Nations Australian Writers Network (FNAWN) is an advocacy and resource service for Indigenous writers and storytellers. Join FNAWN Chairperson, Kerry Reed-Gilbert to celebrate the launch of this new national organisation. Share a yarn with prominent writers John Harding, Jared Thomas, Alexis W

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Madness

Madness: A Memoir begins as Kate Richards describes her attempt to cut off her own arm. Richards’ harrowing book is a chronicle of acute psychosis and depression as experienced by the sufferer – a very astute and often beautiful account of a terrible disease. This session brings together Richard

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Harley Loco

Rayya Elias was born into an Orthodox Christian family in Syria, who in 1967 fled to America. In her extraordinary memoir Harley Loco, Elias chronicles her life as an immigrant, a hair cutter, a punk musician and a drug addict who after various stints in jail and the asylum ends up homeless. And yet

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Griffith Review

For the 43rd edition of the Griffith Review editors Lloyd Jones and Julianne Schultz gathered together a wild mix of New Zealanders and invited them to write about that sometimes-mysterious place over the ditch. This session brings together Eleanor Catton and Gregory O’Brien for a conversation wit

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Cold Light

Frank Moorhouse is a writer at home in the world of politics – be it writing about spies, the League of Nations or drinking with visiting writers. Moorhouse returns to Adelaide having just won the Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature and celebrated his 75th birthday. Join

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Helium

As a 19-year-old student Raj witnessed the incineration of his Professor. It was 1984, a catastrophic year for India’s Sikhs. 25 years later Raj returns to India to seek out his late Professor’s widow. In this harrowing novel Singh is examining India’s oft forgotten anti-Sikh massacres, includ

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Apple Tree Yard

Louise Doughty’s novels go to dangerous places, and stories that are controversial and utterly harrowing are hallmarks of her work. In her most recent novel, Apple Tree Yard, a married middle-aged woman falls under the spell of a man she meets by chance and they soon wind up in court. Join this fa

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The Past Isn't Past

As ANZAC ceremony numbers attest, stories of service are among Australia’s most important narratives. This session brings together two novelists who have recently published books about the Second World War. Flanagan’s The Narrow Road to the Deep North is a harrowing account of a Japanese POW on

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In Translation

This session brings together two of the Spanish language’s most celebrated writers – neither of whom write in Spanish. Bernardo Atxaga is a Basque writer and Jordi Punti writes in Catalan. Both translate their own work into Spanish and others then translate their books into a host of other langu

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A History of Silence

Provoked by the 2011 Christchurch earthquake, Lloyd Jones began his own excavation of his family’s past. His memoir A History of Silence is a journey along fault lines in both the Canterbury region and Jones’ past. In it he is searching for the truth about his family, reasons for silences and th

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Epic Journeys

This session brings together two novelists who have set their stories in the past. These two use real events, but it is up to the writers themselves to create the people and places they are writing about. Elizabeth Gilbert takes us to 19th century America, while Hannah Kent, in the same period, draw

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Dedication

Alexis Wright’s award-winning novel Carpentaria is remarkable for the richness of its language and the scale of its vision. Her new novel The Swan Book, set in a future marked by climate change, mass migration and the continued control of Aboriginals in the north of the country, confirms Wright’

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Betrayal

Dutch novelist Adriaan van Dis grew up in the Netherlands during the Second World War. He was raised in a house with refugees from the Dutch East Indies. As a result van Dis is interested in the way cultures clash and this theme is found in all of his work, including his most recent novel Betrayal.

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Piano Lessons

Anna Goldsworthy is an award-winning classical pianist and writer. She is the author of two memoirs, Piano Lessons and Welcome to Your New Life. She is a regular contributor to The Monthly and recently published the Quarterly Essay: Unfinished Business. Goldsworthy recently returned to Adelaide to t

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Poetry Reading

Join us for what has become an annual event at Writers’ Week. This year our extraordinary line-up includes Australian poets David Malouf and Lisa Jacobson joined by visiting poets Jenny Bornholdt, Gregory O’Brien, Jeet Thayil and Yang Lian. Host: Peter Goldsworthy.

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Cairo

Chris Womersley is the author of three novels. His debut novel The Low Road won a Ned Kelly Award. His second Bereft was shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Literary Award. Most recently Womersley has published Cairo, a novel set in bohemian Melbourne that tells a story about growing up, falling in l

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Who Am I?

Graphic memoirist Alison Bechdel is the author of Fun Home and Are You My Mother?, with both books telling the story of growing up gay in a small town. Rabih Alameddine has written about AIDS, Civil War, exile, death and most recently, in An Unnecessary Woman, what it means to live a meaningful life

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Burial Rites

With her debut novel Hannah Kent has become one of Australia’s most successful contemporary novelists. Kent’s novel tells the story of Agnes Magnúsdóttir, the last woman publically executed in Iceland. Kent’s haunting novel has become an international bestseller, short-listed for a host of p

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A World of Other People

Miles Franklin winner Steven Carroll’s ninth novel, A World of Other People, is set in London during the Blitz and pays a particular homage to T S Elliot and his poetry, including Four Quartets, and in particular ‘Little Gidding’. And while the novel tells the story of three men and a woman, i

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Lost Fathers

In Jordi Punti’s novel Lost Luggage, four young men discover they are brothers when the father they didn’t know they shared disappears. In D W Wilson’s Ballistics, a young man is sent by his grandfather to find the father he has never met. Join these two novelists as they discuss their very di

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The Following

Roger McDonald is a writer who celebrates the Australian landscape and the relationships with land, people, politics and history. In his new novel The Following a chance encounter and a shared secret enable a man to become Prime Minister. When he dies a boy witnesses a mysterious event and like the

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Radiance

In 2013 Louis Nowra became the third playwright to win the Patrick White Award. In this session Nowra looks back with Anthony Steel at his long career as a writer on the page, on the stage and increasingly today in film and television. As a writer Nowra’s range is vast – he is a cultural comment

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Obabakoak

Bernardo Atxaga is a Basque writer and self-translator. He is arguably the Basque language’s most famous writer. Atxaga writes across many genres including poetry, radio, theatre, children’s books and cinema. In English he is best known for his fiction including the prize-winning Obabakoak, The

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Trust

In Louise Doughty’s Apple Tree Yard a middle-aged woman meets a man and is so attracted to him she finds herself having sex in public moments after meeting him. Later she finds herself in court. In Fiona McFarlane’s The Night Guest an old woman on a lonely coastline accepts the offer of help fro

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The No.1 Ladies' Detective Agency

Alexander McCall Smith is a delight. This master storyteller will take you on a journey between Scotland and his characters from Scotland Street and the Isabel Dalhousie novels; Botswana and the much-loved Precious Ramotswe; and the trains of the East Coast of the United Kingdom through to the Austr

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Unapologetic

Francis Spufford is a nonfiction writer and anthologist who has written about many subjects including polar exploration (I May Be Some Time), childhood reading (The Child That Books Built) and Soviet Russia (Red Plenty). Most recently Spufford has published the terrific Unapologetic, a defence of fa

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For God and Country

In Amy Espeseth’s Sufficient Grace a young girl living in a remote religious community must negotiate with her faith as dark secrets are revealed. In Kathryn Heyman’s Floodline, a nurse is trapped with her patients in a hospital during a flood, while a young Christian mother, with her two young

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How Story Finds a Form

This session brings together three writers who write across a number of forms for a conversation about just that – form. Lisa Jacobson is the author of the verse novel The Sunlit Zone. Gregory O’Brien is a poet, essayist, painter and curator, his most recent book is Beauties of the Octagonal Poo

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The Poet's Wife

In a follow-up to her bestselling memoir Dreamtime Alice, Mandy Sayer tells the story of the ten years she spent with American poet Yusef Komunyakaa, first as lovers, then as husband and wife. Sayer met Komunyakaa in New Orleans in 1985 – she was 22 and he was nearly 40. Theirs is an extraordinary

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Narcopolis

In India Jeet Thayil was a well-known performance poet when he published his first novel Narcopolis, which was nominated for the Man Booker Prize and won the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature. Set in the 1970s the novel tells the story of opium dens and heroin addiction in Mumbai. Fascinating, st

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The Flamethrowers

With the publication of her novel The Flamethrowers, Rachel Kushner has established herself as a major American fiction writer. Set in the 1970s New York art world, the novel is a coming of age story like no other. Kushner’s great gift is as a storyteller; her narratives are wonderfully complex an

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Goat Mountain

With the publication of his debut novel Legends of a Suicide, David Vann has become a major voice in contemporary literature. His often-violent novels tell the stories of damaged families living in remote places. In Goat Mountain a boy goes hunting with his father and grandfather, and a terrible acc

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Love and Poetry

Poet, prose writer and anthologist Mark Tredinnick has recently put together Australian Love Poems 2013. He has also recently published a new collection of poems – Bluewren Cantos. This session brings him together with Mike Ladd for a conversation about love and poetry. Join them as they discuss l

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Uses and Abuses of History

Margaret MacMillan is an award-winning historian and expert on international relations. She is arguably best known for her book Peacemakers: The Paris Peace Conference of 1919 and Its Attempt to End War, winner of the Samuel Johnson Prize. MacMillan’s other work includes The Uses and Abuses of His

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WWI

There are said to be over 25,000 histories of the First World War in English alone. This session brings together two novelists and a poet, all of whom have written about the war. In Daisley’s Traitor we meet a young soldier, in Dunmore’s The Lie we follow two childhood friends into the trenches,

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On Travel

In Michelle de Kretser’s Miles Franklin winning novel Questions of Travel a young woman escapes Australia only to return and a young man is forced from Sri Lanka. In Jaspreet Singh’s Helium a now middle-aged man returns to India in search of his one time Professor’s wife. Both novels wrangle w

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Mortal Fire

Elizabeth Knox is a novelist arguably best known for her bestselling The Vintner’s Luck. Knox’s many novels include Billie’s Kiss, The Angel’s Cut and most recently, Wake. Some years ago she began writing for young adults and has so far produced the extraordinary novels Dreamquake, Dreamhunt

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Eureka

Clare Wright is an award-winning historian, writer and broadcaster. Her first book was the best-selling Beyond the Ladies Lounge: Australia’s Female Publicans. Her most recent book The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka is based on a decade of archival research into women’s roles in the Eureka Stockade.

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The Great Debate

Is it possible to have a conversation about faith and science? For over a decade the hostilities have been mounting and it seems neither side can see reason. This session brings together science writer Marcus Chown, author of What a Wonderful World, and Francis Spufford, author of Unapologetic: Why,

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Telling Stories

This session brings together two acclaimed writers dedicated to the craft of storytelling. Rachel Kushner is the author of The Flamethrowers, a hugely rich novel set in 1970s New York. Fiona McFarlane is the author of the novel The Night Guest, an eerie tale of an elderly woman who thinks she can he

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Jade Ladder

Yang Lian is a Chinese poet who was an original member of the controversial Misty Poets group. He was in Auckland during the Tiananmen Square uprising and was granted political asylum by New Zealand. His poetry was blacklisted in China and his citizenship revoked. To date six of his collections are

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Damned If I Do

Philip Nitschke’s most recent book is a memoir, Damned If I Do, a chronicle of his early days here in Adelaide, his time in the Far North working with Aboriginal rights groups, and his campaign to have euthanasia legalised in Australia. It also covers the controversy that surrounds his life work.

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The Consequences of History

In Forgotten Wars historian Henry Reynolds insists that we acknowledge the resistance to the land grab that was colonial Australia. In Adriaan van Dis’ novel Betrayal a Dutchman returns to South Africa years after he fought to free the country from apartheid. Join these two thinkers as they discus

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Barracuda

Christos Tsiolkas has over the last decade emerged as one of Australia’s most celebrated writers and important social commentators. With his award-winning novel The Slap Tsiolkas established an international reputation for his compelling critique of the rather pleased-with-itself Australian middle

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The Lie

Helen Dunmore is an Orange Prize winning novelist, poet and children’s writer. She is author of the novels The Spell in Winter, The Siege and, most recently, The Lie. She is also the author of the best-selling young adult novels The Ingo Chronicles. She is a writer who has richly imagined the sieg

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Gotland

Fiona Capp is the author of four novels, and three works of non-fiction, including That Oceanic Feeling, a memoir about the sea and surfing, and My Blood’s Country, a journey through the landscapes which inspired Australian poet Judith Wright. Her fiction includes the novels Musk & Byrne and G

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Love in War Time

Steven Carroll’s A World of Other People is a story of love in London during the Blitz. In Cory Taylor’s My Beautiful Enemy a young Australian soldier falls in love with a Japanese enemy alien. Join these two distinguished writers as they explore love in two very different landscapes during war

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His Own Steam

Gregory O’Brien is a poet, essayist, artist, short story writer, anthologist and curator. He is the author most recently of A Micronaut in the Wide World: The Imaginative Life and Times of Graham Percy and Beauties of the Octagonal Pool. He has also written about the Australian painter Euan Macleo

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The Colony

In Aboriginal Convicts Kristyn Harman uncovers the stories of Aboriginal convicts, including Maori warriors and Khoisan soldiers, transported to Australian penal colonies. In Forgotten War, Henry Reynolds insists we acknowledge the many skirmishes between settlers and Aboriginals during settlement

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Questions of Travel

Michelle de Kretser was born in Sri Lanka and immigrated to Australia when she was 14. She is the author of The Rose Grower, The Hamilton Case, which won the Commonwealth Prize, and The Lost Dog, which won both the NSW Premier’s Book of the Year Award and the Christina Stead Prize for fiction. Her

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Role Models

John Waters is a film director, screenwriter, actor, stand-up comedian, journalist, visual artist and art collector. In this session Waters talks about his writing life, including his recent book Role Models. The book is a collection of essays about the people Waters admires and is classic Waters

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Faith Based

Besieged by scandal, hounded by atheists and with congregation numbers falling – one wonders if it is getting harder to be a Christian. This session brings together esteemed church historian Diarmaid MacCulloch, author of The History of Christianity, and writer Francis Spufford, author of Unapolog

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Improving the News

Geoff Page is an award-winning poet who has published nineteen collections of poetry as well as two novels, five verse novels and several other works including anthologies, translations and a biography of the jazz musician Bernie McGann. Page has an abiding interest in the history of his family and

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Subcultures

Some of contemporary literature’s most compelling stories come from those that are writing about twilight worlds – be they drug dens or swimming pools at private schools. Jeet Thayil’s haunting novel Narcopolis explores opium and heroin addiction on the shabby streets of Mumbai. Christos Tsiol

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The Great War

A one-time foreign correspondent Paul Ham’s sleuthing skills have served him well as a military historian – as does his training in economic history. Ham’s award-winning books include: Hiroshima Nagasaki, Vietnam: The Australian War and Kokoda. More recently he has published Sandakan: The Unto

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Reading in the Marketplace

This session bring together three of the visiting publishers taking part in the Australia Council’s Visiting International Publishing program for a conversation about readers. The question is about the role of the reader in today’s publishing world. What agency, if any, does the reader have as a

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The Reef

Iain McCalman’s passionate narrative about the Great Barrier Reef is a history, a memoir, a portrait of extraordinary souls and a chronicle of one of nature’s most spectacular endeavours. As eccentric as it is erudite, this ambitious book reveals the reef to be as much a product of the human ima

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Yuendumu Doors

The Yuendumu Doors are among the freshest, most remarkable documents of Aboriginal art. Painted thirty years ago at a remote desert school by artists steeped in ritual knowledge, the Doors survived against the odds. After near-obliteration by desert winds, sun and children’s graffiti, the Doors ha

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Adelaide Writers' Week

  Adelaide’s iconic literary festival returns in 2013 with a whole new host of writers, stories and literary adventures. Adelaide Writers’ Week brings together some of the world’s greatest writers and thinkers for a celebration of the written word that will surprise, delight, challenge

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Adelaide Writers' Week Kids’ Day

Join us for a day of stories, paintings and games under the trees and in the company of a rather gorgeous giant frog. Kids’ Day this year features a Story Tent where writers from around Australia and the world read books, spin yarns and sing songs. Little artists can make watercolour paintings and

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Lost Voices: Christopher Koch

East Stage, 9.30am Christopher Koch is among our most celebrated contemporary novelists. His long career has produced the Miles Franklin winners The Doubleman and Highways to a War. His novel The Year of Living Dangerously, won numerous awards, and was made into a film. More recently Koch has pub

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Tasmania: James Boyce & Rohan Wilson

East Stage, 10.45am Historian James Boyce and novelist Rohan Wilson have both explored Tasmania’s convict past. In Van Diemen’s Land, Boyce explores how convicts were changed by the landscape they encountered. In his novel The Roving Party Wilson tells the story of a group of convicts in sear

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Not Her Real Name: Emily Perkins

East Stage, 12pm Emily Perkins is one of the most accomplished of our contemporary fiction writers. She is the author of four novels including Novel About My Wife, which won The Believer Book Award, and a collection of short stories, Not Her Real Name. Most recently she has published the critical

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Every Grain of Rice: Fuschia Dunlop

East Stage, 1.15pm Fuchsia Dunlop is one of the world authorities on Chinese cuisine. She is a cook and a food-writer and the author of Every Grain of Rice: Simple Chinese Home Cooking; Shark’s Fin and Sichuan Pepper: A Sweet-Sour Memoir of Eating in China, an account of her adventures in exp

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Engineers of the Soul: Frank Westerman

East Stage, 2.30pm Frank Westerman books are an elegant mix of history and travel. Ararat is an account of a journey up the mountain and a reflection on science and religion. Engineers of the Soul is an examination of writers writing under Stalin, and Brother Mendel’s Perfect Horse is a history

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Outsiders: Tatjana Soli and Charlotte Wood

East Stage, 3.45pm The outsider is an important figure in contemporary literature. Tatjana Soli and Charlotte Wood both write characters that don’t quite fit. Tatjana Soli’s characters include an American woman journalist in Vietnam and a stubborn citrus farmer in California battling cancer.

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Cairo: Ahdaf Soueif & Parker Bilal

East Stage, 5pm Cairo is the largest city in the Arab world. It is a city of great wealth and even greater poverty, one that at this moment continues to struggle with its political future. Ahdaf Soueif has written about the city as both a novelist, Map of Love and as a political commentator, Cair

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Words Vs. Images: Oliver Burkeman, Pat Grant, Olivier Pollet

West Stage, 12pm When it comes to convincing, what’s more persuasive – words or images? Oliver Burkeman is a journalist who uses words to debunk the ever burgeoning world of self-help. Graphic novelist Pat Grant, author of Blue, uses both to talk about immigration. Documentary filmmaker Olivi

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Short Haul Engine: Karen Solie

West Stage, 1.15pm Karen Solie is one of the most exciting voices in contemporary poetry. She is the author of three collections, Short Haul Engine, Modern and Norman and most recently the Griffin Prize winning Pigeon. In Pigeon Solie takes us on a journey across the Canadian landscape – from m

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The Next Generation: LK Holt, Josephine Rowe, Fiona Wright

West Stage, 2.30pm Join three of Australia’s most distinguished younger poets for both readings and a conversation about poetry in Australia today. Fiona Wright’s first collection of poems, Knuckled was published in 2011. Josephine Rowe is the both a poet and a short fiction writer, her most

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Writing South Australia: Dylan Coleman & Stephen Orr

West Stage, 3.45pm There are few subjects as fascinating as one’s home state. In her debut novel, Mazing Grace, Dylan Coleman has written a fictional account of her mother’s childhood at the Koonibba Lutheran Mission. In books as varied as Hill of Grace and Time’s Long Ruin Stephen Orr has

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Cold Cold Ground: Adrian McKinty

West Stage, 5pm Irish born Adrian McKinty has been described as a master of modern Noir. Born in Belfast, McKinty read law, politics and philosophy before moving to Harlem, New York City – all of which feature in his clever and violent novels. His is the author of two trilogies, one crime, the

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Lives: Peter Robb

East Stage, 9.30am Peter Robb is one of Australia’s finest non-fiction writers. Robb’s first book was the critically acclaimed and hugely successful Midnight in Sicily. His next, M, a biography of Caravaggio, provoked controversy and was again a bestseller. This was followed by A Death in Bra

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Urban Myths: John Tranter

East Stage, 10.45am One of our most esteemed poets, John Tranter, has now published some 20 books of poetry. His most recent collections include the prize-winning Starlight: 150 poems and Urban Myths: 210 Poems: New and Selected. Tranter is also well known as an editor and publisher. He is the fo

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At Last: Edward St Aubyn

East Stage, 12pm Edward St Aubyn is an extraordinary writer. He is the author a five book series chronicling the life of Patrick Melrose, scion to a wealthy English family. The series began with Never Mind and was completed with the publication of At Last. St Aubyn’s gift as a writer is not jus

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Immigrant Nation: Pat Grant & Tim Soutphommasane

East Stage, 1.15pm There are few narratives as fractious here in Australia as those which concern immigration. In his graphic novel Blue Pat Grant attempts a response to the Cronulla Riots that is measured and fair. In his books and lectures, social commentator, and first generation Australian, T

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Sri Lanka: Frances Harrison & Niromi de Soyza

East Stage, 2.30pm The 26 year civil war that plagued Sri Lanka ended in 2009 with the defeat of the Tamil Tigers. In this session, Frances Harrison, author of Still Counting the Dead, talks about her chronicle of the massacres and subsequent war crimes. Niromi de Soyza, former child soldier and

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Dogs at the Perimeter: Madeleine Thien

West Stage, 1.15pm Canadian born novelist Madeleine Thien is the child of Chinese-Malay immigrants, and stories of families and immigrants populate her novels. Certainty is a love story set in Japanese occupied Malaysia, - it explores the legacies of loss as well as redemption. Her more recent no

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The People Smuggler: Robin de Crespigny

East Stage, 5pm Sydney filmmaker Robin de Crespigny spent two years chronicling the true story of Ali Al Jenabi, an Iraqi refugee who survived Abu Ghraib, joined the resistance and became a people smuggler to save his family, and ultimately came to be seen, not as the heinous criminal, but as the

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From Sea to Sea: Karen Solie & Zsuzsi Gartner

West Stage, 9.30am Canada in the world’s imagination is a place of natural wonder, maple leaves, and hockey –not entirely accurate. This session brings together two Canadian writers on the subject of Canada. Zsuzsi Gartner writes about a very urban place in her terrific short stories. Karen S

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You Aren’t What You Eat: Steven Poole

West Stage, 10.45am In the age of Masterchef, Jamie and Nigella, we have all, to some extent, become obsessed with food - food fads, food celebrity, and too much gastro-porn. Steven Poole is a tonic. His recent book You Aren’t What You Eat is a very smart, and often hilarious, polemic against t

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M L Stedman

West Stage, 12pm With her debut novel The Light Between Oceans, M L Stedman has established herself a major new voice in contemporary fiction. Set on a lonely island off the coast of Western Australia, the novel tells the story of a young lighthouse keeper and his wife. One day a boat washes asho

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The Art of the Picture Book: Nick Bland & Tohby Riddle

East Stage, 3.45pm For most readers, picture books are our first introduction to words, images, ideas and stories. Join two writer/illustrators in a conversation about the relationship between words and images. Nick Bland’s many books include A Monster Wrote Me a Letter, The Wrong Book and The

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Girl Power: Justine Larbalestier, Isobelle Carmody, Vikki Wakefield

West Stage, 2.30pm The readership for YA fiction continues to grow and grow. Yet for young women today questions of identity, sexuality and friendship remain as problematic as ever. This session asks - how do women write for girls? Join Justine Larbalestier, author of Liar, Isobelle Carmody, auth

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Redemption in Indigo: Karen Lord

West Stage, 3.45pm Karen Lord is a rising star in the world of speculative fiction. Her first novel, Redemption in Indigo, a retelling of a Senegalese folk-tale, is a delightful mix of fantasy, folklore and science. It is work of the best kind of storytelling. Most recently Lord has published The

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Leviathan: Scott Westerfeld

West Stage, 5pm Scott Westerfeld is one of the speculative fiction’s most popular and highly acclaimed writers. He is the author of eighteen novels; five adult, the rest for young adults. He is arguably most famous for his Uglies series – set in a future when cosmetic surgery is compulsive at

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The Fishing Fleet: Anne de Courcy

East Stage, 9.30am Celebrated biographer Anne de Courcy is arguably best known for Snowden and The Biography and Diana Mosley. She is also the author of Debs At War: 1939 – 1945 How Wartime Changed Their Lives and 1939: The Last Season. Most recently she has published The Fishing Fleet: Husband

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Strange Meetings: Harry Ricketts

East Stage, 10.45am Harry Ricketts is a biographer, a poet, a cricket enthusiast, an editor, anthologist and literary scholar. As a biographer his books include The Unforgiving Minute: A Life of Rudyard Kipling and more recently Strange Meetings: The Poets of the Great War. His most recent collec

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Map of Love: Ahdaf Soueif

East Stage, 12pm Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif is arguably best known for her extraordinary novel, The Map of Love, which was short-listed for the Booker and translated in 21 languages. She is also the author In the Eye of the Sun and Stories of Ourselves. Souief is also a political and cultural

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The Art of History: Tom Holland & Tom Keneally

East Stage, 1.15pm Writing history depends on a delicate balance. Research requires narrative if it is to engage its readers. This session brings together two of the great stylists, men who are praised for the history they recover as they are for the stories they tell. Tom Holland is the author o

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A New Kind of Writing: Frank Westerman and Ann Wroe

East Stage, 2.30pm This session brings together two writers challenging the conventions that surround history and biography to create wonderful imaginative books. Frank Westerman has used a history of the Lipizzaner stallion to explore warfare in modern Europe. Ann Wroe has written ‘alternative

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Outlaws: Courtney Collins & Rohan Wilson

East Stage, 3.45pm Australia enjoys an enduring relationship with the notion of the outlaw. Courtney Collins’ debut novel, The Burial, tells the story of woman on the run, a horse thief who’s killed her husband. Rohan Wilson’s award winning The Roving Party tells the story of gang of men wh

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Highways to a War: A Reading

East Stage, 5pm War stories are among our oldest narratives and this session of readings will explore some of our more recent wars. Christopher Koch has taken us to Cambodia, Vietnam and Indonesia. Peter Robb has introduced us to the mean streets of Italy and Brazil. Tom Keneally has chronicled b

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1835: James Boyce

West Stage, 9.30am The award-winning historian James Boyce is the author of Van Diemen’s Land: A History and more recently 1835: The Founding of Melbourne and the Conquest of Australia. The first offers an alternative narrative to that of ‘Little England’ and shows how the poor, the exiled

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All Stories are Love Stories: Karen Lord, Emily St John Mandel, Charlotte Wood

West Stage, 10.45am Most people enjoy a good love story, especially the unusual ones. Karen Lord’s The Best of All Possible Worlds, is a stunning piece of science fiction and an epic love story . Many of Emily St John Mandel’s characters struggle with love, with loyalty and failed expectation

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It Takes a Village: Shanaka Fernando & Andrea Hirata

West Stage, 1.15pm Andrea Hirata is Indonesia’s most famous living novelist. His novel, The Rainbow Troops, tells the story of a group of children in a small village fighting to keep their school. Shanaka Fernando is the creator of the Lentil As Anything restaurants – which rely entirely on t

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The Power of Negative Thinking: Oliver Burkeman

West Stage, 2.30pm Oliver Burkeman writes a column for The Guardian, ‘This Column Will Change Your Life’, in which he writes about social psychology, self-help culture and the science of happiness. He has recently published The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can’t Stand Positive Thinkin

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Sexual Politics: Justine Larbalestier, Bryony Lavery, Chika Unigwe

West Stage, 3.45pm As the debate about what it means to be a feminist is ongoing, this session brings together three writers, all of whom identify as feminists. Justine Larbalestier is a YA and fantasy writer, playwright Bryony Lavery is the author of iconic works including Thursday and Chika Uni

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Still Counting the Dead: Frances Harrison

West Stage, 5pm For many years Frances Harrison worked as a foreign correspondent for the BBC, and had postings in Iran, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Bangladesh and Pakistan. From 2000-4 she was the BBC Correspondent in Sri Lanka and her new book Still Counting the Dead: Survivors of Sri Lanka’s Hidden

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The Daughters of Mars: Tom Keneally

East Stage, 9.30am Tom Keneally is one of our most esteemed writers of fiction, non-fiction, and memoir. Among his many prize-wining books are Schindler’s List, Three Cheers for the Paraclete and The People’s Train. Most recently Keneally has published the novel, The Daughters of Mars, a stor

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The Great War: Ross McMullin & Harry Ricketts

East Stage, 10.45am One of English speaking world’s most enduring narratives is that of the Lost Generation. In Farewell, Dear People historian Ross McMullin offers us biographies of extraordinary men Australia lost to the war. In Strange Meetings, biographer and poet Harry Ricketts, chronicles

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By The Book: Ramona Koval

East Stage, 12pm Ramona Koval is a reader, and in her new book, By the Book, Koval tells us the story of her as a reader, giving us a glimpse of her books and they ways in which they have become an autobiography. Beginning with her mother, a committed reader, Koval takes us from St Kilda out into

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Yellow Birds: Kevin Powers

East Stage, 1.15pm Kevin Powers enlisted when he 17 and between 2004 and 2005 he served in the US Army in Mosul and Tel Afar. After his honourable discharge he completed an MFA in poetry. Powers’ debut novel, The Yellow Birds is a masterpiece. It tells the story of two young men in battle and o

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Writing as Parker Bilal: Jamal Mahjoub

East Stage 2.30pm Literary novelist Jamal Mahjoub’s many books include the recently reissued The Drift Latitudes. Mahjoub, now writing as Parker Bilal, has begun a terrific series of mysteries set in Cairo. The first, The Golden Scales, introduces us to Makana, a former Sudanese police inspecto

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Native Title: Melissa Lucashenko & Patti Miller

East Stage, 3.45pm Set in country New South Wales, Melissa Lucashenko’s new novel, Mullumbimby, tells the story of a single mother trying to make a life while her lover negotiates a Native Title Claim. In her memoir, The Mind of a Thief, Patti Miller tells the story of her home town, Wellington

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The Future of the Asia Pacific: Andrea Hirata, Loretta Napoleoni, Tim Soutphommasane

East Stage, 5pm Since the Bali bombings Indonesia has turned from holiday destination to potentially sinister outpost. China’s monster economy is seen as our saviour. Immigrants from Asia continue to arrive, and our politicians continue to bicker. This panel brings together novelist Andrea Hira

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The Biographer: Brenda Niall

West Stage, 9.30am Celebrated biographer Brenda Niall is best known for her work on the Boyd family of artists and writers, including the biography Martin Boyd. Recently Niall has published True North: The Story of Mary and Elizabeth Durack. Drawing on letters and family papers Niall has drawn in

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The Singer’s Gun: Emily St John Mandel

West Stage, 10.45am Emily St John Mandel is the author of three novels: Last Night in Montreal, The Singer’s Gun and most recently The Lola Quartet. While none of the novels can be described as crime novels, each involves a crime – a missing girl, a human trafficking ring, a bag of stolen mon

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The Food Thing: Max Allen, Fuchsia Dunlop, Steven Poole

West Stage, 12pm The rise and rise of food culture and the general public’s food enthusiasm is seemingly endless – especially when Masterchef is on. This panel brings together wine writer Max Allen, cook and food writer Fuchsia Dunlop with the cultural critic Steven Poole for a conversation a

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The Politics of the Stage: Bryony Lavery & Omphile Molusi

West Stage, 1.15pm Bryony Lavery is best known for her work in the theatre, including the recent Thursday. Lavery is a feminist writer, who acknowledges the political in her work. Omphile Molusi is a young playwright, writing about post-Apartheid South Africa, in his play Itsoseng. Join these two

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The Chameleon: Charlotte Wood

West Stage, 2.30pm Charlotte Wood is both one our finest and also most versatile writers. Best known as a novelist, Wood is the author of four novels, including The Submerged Cathedral, The Children, Pieces of a Girl and most recently the wonderfully observed 24 hour love story – Animal People.

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Poetry Reading

West Stage, 3.45pm No literary festival is complete without the poetry reading. This session brings together some of our most celebrated poets including visiting international poets Karen Solie (Pigeon), Kurt Heinzelman (Black Butterflies) and Harry Ricketts (Just Then). They will be joined by Ca

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For The Right Reasons: A Play Reading

West Stage, 5pm For the first time Writers’ Week will host a play reading in the Garden. The play is by gifted young playwright Omphile Molusi, author of Isotseng. The reading is of his new play, For the Right Reasons, and tells the story of a group of teenagers negotiating mixed race school in

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Women Artists: Janine Burke & Brenda Niall

East Stage, 9.30am Janine Burke is an award-winning author of art history, biography and fiction. She has a particular interest in the Heide Circle, and is the author of Australian Gothic and The Heart Garden. Brenda Niall is a biographer best known for her work on the Boyd family, and more recen

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Orpheus: Ann Wroe

East Stage, 10.45 Ann Wroe is both a celebrated biographer and the obituaries writer for The Economist. Her books include Perkin, the story of Perkin Warbeck’s attempts on the throne, Pilate: The Biography of an Invented Man and Being Shelley: The Poet’s Search for Himself. Most recently she

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The Raj: Anne de Courcy & Harry Ricketts

East Stage, 12pm In The Fishing Fleet: Husband Hunting in the Raj Anne de Courcy recreates the decadent and sometimes quite difficult world of English women living in India. In The Unforgiving Minute, Harry Ricketts writes an intimate portrait of Rudyard Kipling, that complicated chronicler of li

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The Burning Library: Geordie Williamson

East Stage, 1.15pm Geordie Williamson is the chief literary critic at The Australian; he is also very passionate about Australia’s literary past. The Burning Library: Our Great Novelists Lost and Found is a wonderful reclamation of our national literature. In the book Williamson writes about a

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The Forgetting Tree: Tatjana Soli

East Stage, 2.30pm American novelist Tatjana Soli writes about what happens when cultures meet. In her first novel, The Lotus Eaters, winner of the James Tait Black Prize, she explored the relationship between an American photographer and her Vietnamese lover. In The Forgetting Tree she tells the

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Montebello: Robert Drewe

East Stage, 3.45pm Robert Drewe is an award-winning novelist, a non-fiction writer and an editor. His many works of fiction include Our Sunshine, A Cry in the Jungle and The Bodysurfers. Drewe is also the author of the highly acclaimed memoir The Shark Net, which has been adapted for film. The se

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Maonomics: Loretta Napoleoni

East Stage, 5pm Italian economist, journalist and political analyst, Loretta Napoleoni, has written about terrorism, piracy, Eastern Europe’s sex trade, China’s ‘online sweat shops’, new economics, environmental issues and social media. Her new book, Maonomics: Why Chinese Communists Make

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All the Anxious Girls: Zsuzsi Gartner

West Stage, 9.30am Zsuzsi Gartner is the author of two utterly original collections of short stories. Her debut collection All the Anxious Girls on Earth is a wild, poignant and often hilarious call for a bit more personal responsibility. Her second, Better Living through Plastic Explosives, shor

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